Bladder Stones

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If you’re following my blog, you’ll notice that I don’t often write blog entries about what I did on a particular day. Today, I’ll make an exception.

Today I took my guinea pig to the vets. You can see an older picture of her to the left. Having her stomach x-rayed a few weeks ago, because she wouldn’t touch food1, the vets found that she had two rather large bladder stones, which were taken out today. There’s a picture of them after the jump.

Now when you look at them here, keep in mind that guinea pigs aren’t very large. Their bladder is only about three or four centimeters across, under normal circumstances. Having two stones in it, one of which (the left) is about 1.9 cm2 long, means there’s not very much room for regular bladder contents.

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You can see by how the second stone has been polished into a hollowed out shape, there really can’t have been a lot of space for them to move around.

She’s doing well though, and at her slightly advanced age, that’s comforting to know.

Seeing that such stones don’t grow overnight, I can’t help but wonder for how long she’s had them — and if she’s been so skittish because she never felt quite alright with those things scraping against her insides.

  1. Just a mild stomach upset. []
  2. For you metrically challenged people, that’s 3/4th of an inch. []
  • http://www.unwesen.de/ unwesen

    Piggy died tonight. The operation was 11 days ago, and there didn’t seem to be any complications. Yesterday, she wasn’t as interested in food as guinea pigs usually are (but still somewhat interested), and today… I was going to take her to the vets again, and discovered her dead in her cage.

  • http://www.bookembargo.com Shrimpy

    Hey there. I just wanted to write and say how sorry I am for your loss. You have had a bad time of it lately. At least Pigg got some some stone-free living before she passed on.

    *hugs*